What is truth


John 17:16-17

They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth.

The truth that we believe is not the “truth” of this world. It shouldn’t be surprising to us when our claim of eternal truth from God is rejected by the thinkers of this present age, this present darkness. Let us love them with an other-worldly love, even as we proclaim to them an other-worldly truth. 

Rescue the Perishing

I think we are often uncomfortable in the way we speak about witnessing Christ to others and our roles as “soul-winners”. It is biblical and true, of course, to think of ourselves primarily as “ambassadors for Christ” (Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. 2 Cor. 5:20 ESV) And so, we could be content to view ourselves as representatives with an interest in speaking the cause of Christ but with a (perhaps) dispassionate view of the person we are reaching out to…

Fanny Crosby, the great gospel hymn-writer of the 19th century had no qualms about calling us to “rescue the perishing”. In one of her most moving hymns, she calls for us to passionately, even desperately, seek and save the lost.

Rescue the perishing, care for the dying,

Snatch them in pity from sin and the grave;

Weep o’er the erring one, lift up the fallen,

Tell them of Jesus, the mighty to save.

(chorus)

Down in the human heart, crushed by the tempter,

Feelings lie buried that grace can restore;

Touched by a loving heart, wakened by kindness,

Chords that are broken will vibrate once more.

(repeat chorus)

Rescue the perishing, duty demands it;

Strength for thy labor the Lord will provide;

Back to the narrow way patiently win them;

Tell the poor wand’rer a Savior has died.

(repeat chorus)

(Chorus)

Rescue the perishing, care for the dying;

Jesus is merciful, Jesus will save.

Our Purpose Here on Earth

I just read this encouraging devotional thought from Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening”:

If God had willed it, each of us might have entered heaven at the moment of conversion. It was not absolutely necessary for our preparation for immortality that we should tarry here. It is possible for a man to be taken to heaven, and to be found meet to be a partaker of the inheritance of the saints in light, though he has but just believed in Jesus. It is true that our sanctification is a long and continued process, and we shall not be perfected till we lay aside our bodies and enter within the veil; but nevertheless, had the Lord so willed it, he might have changed us from imperfection to perfection, and have taken us to heaven at once. Why then are we here? Would God keep his children out of paradise a single moment longer than was necessary? Why is the army of the living God still on the battle-field when one charge might give them the victory? Why are his children still wandering hither and thither through a maze, when a solitary word from his lips would bring them into the centre of their hopes in heaven? The answer is—they are here that they may “live unto the Lord,” and may bring others to know his love. We remain on earth as sowers to scatter good seed; as ploughmen to break up the fallow ground; as heralds publishing salvation. We are here as the “salt of the earth,” to be a blessing to the world. We are here to glorify Christ in our daily life. We are here as workers for him, and as “workers together with him.” Let us see that our life answereth its end. Let us live earnest, useful, holy lives, to “the praise of the glory of his grace.” Meanwhile we long to be with him, and daily sing—

“My heart is with him on his throne,
And ill can brook delay;
Each moment listening for the voice,
‘Rise up, and come away.’ ”