“All that I have commanded you…”

Matthew 28:19–20 (ESV): Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

The process of making disciples is ongoing. We continue to do it until the end of the age. I’m confident that Jesus is with me, with us, in this process because he promised that he would be. “…behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

So we know that he is with us, our “hope of glory” (Col. 1:27), helping us in the process of making disciples. We can have great joy even in the midst of difficulty because of his abiding presence with us. There is no doubt that he is with me through the presence of his spirit, our great power of the Holy Spirit. But I would say also that he is with us in the very things that he has commanded us to do. That is, he is with us in “all that I have commanded you.” He is with us in the Holy Scriptures.

All that Jesus trusted and quoted and promised to fulfill of the Law and the Prophets, as well as what the Holy Spirit inspired in the New Testament writers, all of that is imbued with his very living presence. As we abide in the Scriptures, we abide in him. As we use the Scriptures as the foundation of our “teaching (disciples) to observe”, he is with us.

And his power in teaching is so much greater than our power. His wisdom so much greater than our wisdom.

If you grow weary in your efforts in making disciples, return again to trusting and believing in the power of Christ, working through his testimonies, to do “far more abundantly than all that we ask or think.” (Eph. 3:20)

Humbling yourself

Matthew 23:12 (ESV): Whoever exalts himself will be humbled, and whoever humbles himself will be exalted.

I can somewhat understand how I can exalt myself, both inwardly and publicly, in various ways. I have exalted myself on more than one occasion. I’ve then just as often been humbled (or humiliated) in the aftermath. It’s interesting how humiliation is most often a public thing. I rarely find myself humiliated in my private thoughts…

So where does the ability to humble myself come from? How can I, being imperfect and human and stupid and insensitive, make myself humble? Is that even possible?

I love Tim Keller’s quote: “Humility, true humility, is not thinking less of yourself. It’s thinking of yourself less.”

And there may be the necessary act in humbling myself. I can’t actively, in a sense, humble myself. But I do take on the attitude and action of Christ-like humility simply by thinking of myself (about myself) less.

So today, Lord, help me to think of others more: how I can serve? how can I pray? how can I actively make the lives of others better?

Roots of worship


Gratitude is rooted in remembering. Joy, peace and worship are the fruit growing out of the healthy vine of thankfulness.

Psalm 9:1-2

I will give thanks to the LORD with my whole heart;

I will recount all of your wonderful deeds.

I will be glad and exult in you;

I will sing praise to your name, O Most High.

Heaven is like…


I woke up early this morning. I don’t know why, really. Maybe it was so I could see this sunrise.

I thought, “Heaven is like this…” 

But then I realized there will be a day with no more analogies of “Heaven is like…” 

There will just be an eternal day of Heaven is.

Wisdom in Worship


As we gather for worship today, let us make it our prayer that God would grant us wisdom in the knowledge of him. This only happens through the work of the Holy Spirit, so let us also pray that he would reveal God to us through Christ, and that in the awe of that revelation, we would worship. 

Love is from God

God rescued us from self-love through the ultimate act of self-less love: his love displayed on the cross. Jesus is love, for God is love. If you know God through Jesus, you have the inexhaustible supply of his Holy love filling you. What will you do with that love today?