My Faith Has Found a Resting Place

My Faith Has Found - graphic

A few weeks ago, the first line of this old hymn came to mind. I had it wrong, though. I remembered it as saying, “my soul has found a resting place.” When I looked up the words to the hymn, I discovered I got the line wrong, but it was OK. This song expresses so much of the WHY I can rest in God. Originally written in 1890 by E.E. Hewitt, the comforting and strengthening truths of our security in Christ’s finished work are worthy to be sung again and again.

My prayer is that this would be an encouragement to the church. Let me know what you think of it. If you would like a copy of the lead sheet, let me know in the comments or email me, thgmusic(at)gmail(dot)com.

words: E.E. Hewitt
music & additional words: Brad Pearson
Verse 1
My faith has found a resting place,
not in device nor creed;
I trust the Ever-living One,
His wounds for me shall plead.

Verse 2
Enough for me that Jesus saves,
this ends my fear and doubt;
a sinful soul I come to Him,
He’ll never cast me out.

Chorus
I need no other argument,
I need no other plea,
it is enough that Jesus died,
and that He died for me.

Verse 3
My heart is leaning on the Word,
the living Word of God,
salvation by my Savior’s name,
salvation through His blood.

Bridge
My great Physician heals the sick,
the lost He came to save;
for me His precious blood He shed,
for me His life He gave.

Verse 4
Now as I walk by faith, not sight,
my hope remains secure.
My Lord, who keeps His faithful word
shall help me to endure.

This arrangement ©2016 by Brad Pearson

Rescue the Perishing

I think we are often uncomfortable in the way we speak about witnessing Christ to others and our roles as “soul-winners”. It is biblical and true, of course, to think of ourselves primarily as “ambassadors for Christ” (Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. 2 Cor. 5:20 ESV) And so, we could be content to view ourselves as representatives with an interest in speaking the cause of Christ but with a (perhaps) dispassionate view of the person we are reaching out to…

Fanny Crosby, the great gospel hymn-writer of the 19th century had no qualms about calling us to “rescue the perishing”. In one of her most moving hymns, she calls for us to passionately, even desperately, seek and save the lost.

Rescue the perishing, care for the dying,

Snatch them in pity from sin and the grave;

Weep o’er the erring one, lift up the fallen,

Tell them of Jesus, the mighty to save.

(chorus)

Down in the human heart, crushed by the tempter,

Feelings lie buried that grace can restore;

Touched by a loving heart, wakened by kindness,

Chords that are broken will vibrate once more.

(repeat chorus)

Rescue the perishing, duty demands it;

Strength for thy labor the Lord will provide;

Back to the narrow way patiently win them;

Tell the poor wand’rer a Savior has died.

(repeat chorus)

(Chorus)

Rescue the perishing, care for the dying;

Jesus is merciful, Jesus will save.

The Light and Heat

Just a brief post this morning.

This is a hymn by William Cowper (1731-1800), perhaps best known as the author of “There Is a Fountain Filled with Blood” and “God Moves in a Mysterious Way”. As Kenneth Osbeck says in his introduction to the hymn, “This hymn teaches an important truth: The same Spirit of God who authored the Bible is the One who enlightens it for our understanding and guidance…”

The Spirit breathes upon the Word, and brings the truth to sight;

Precepts and promises afford a sanctifying light.

A glory gilds the sacred page, majestic like the sun:

It gives a light to ev’ry age; it gives but borrows none.

The Hand that gave it still supplies the gracious light and heat;

His truths upon the nations rise; they rise but never set.

Let everlasting thanks be Thine for such a bright display

As makes a world of darkness shine with beams of heav’nly day.

My soul rejoices to pursue the steps of Him I love,

Till glory breaks upon my view in brighter worlds above.

Overlapping Devotional thoughts

As part of my daily devotions I read through Scripture and read from Kenneth Osbeck’s “Amazing Grace: 366 Inspiring Hymn Stories for Daily Devotions”. I also frequently read from C. H. Spurgeon’s excellent “Morning and Evening” devotional. Today there was a happy overlapping of the devotional thoughts from them. First, here is a quote from the Spurgeon:

“We are married unto Christ; and shall our great Bridegroom permit his spouse to linger in constant grief? Our hearts are knit unto him: we are his members, and though for awhile we may suffer as our Head once suffered, yet we are even now blessed with heavenly blessings in him. We have the earnest (down payment or guarantee) of our inheritance in the comforts of the Spirit, which are neither few nor small. Inheritors of joy for ever, we have foretastes of our portion. There are streaks of the light of joy to herald our eternal sunrising. Our riches are beyond the sea; our city with firm foundations lies on the other side the river; gleams of glory from the spirit-world cheer our hearts, and urge us onward.”

The hymn for today is called “The Sands of Time Are Sinking” by Anne Ross Cousin (1824-1906). Here is the hymn text, as quoted in the devotional:

The sands of time are sinking, the dawn of heaven breaks; the summer morn I’ve sighed for—the fair, sweet morn awakes. Dark, dark hath been the midnight, but day-spring is at hand, and glory, glory dwelleth in Immanuel’s land.

O Christ, He is the fountain, the deep, sweet well of love! The streams on earth I’ve tasted more deep I’ll drink above: There to an ocean fulness His mercy doth expand, and glory, glory dwelleth in Immanuel’s land.

O I am my Beloved’s, and my Beloved’s mine! He brings a poor vile sinner into His “house of wine.” I stand upon His merit—I know no other stand, not e’en where glory dwelleth in Immanuel’s land.

The Bride eyes not her garment but her dear Bridegroom’s face; I will not gaze at glory but on my King of grace, not at the crown He giveth but on His pierced hand: The Lamb is all the glory of Immanuel’s land.

Spurgeon says, “we have foretastes of our portion”. The hymn says, “the streams on earth I’ve tasted more deep I’ll drink above.”

“There are streaks of the light of joy to herald our eternal sunrising”, says Spurgeon.  “The dawn of heaven breaks…the fair, sweet morn awakes” speaks the hymn.

There is also the comparison of the church and Christ as Bridegroom and Bride: “We are married unto Christ; and shall our great Bridegroom permit his spouse to linger in constant grief?” “The Bride eyes not her garment but her dear Bridegroom’s face.”

All, all of this is written to encourage our hearts towards thoughts of our eternal home. May we ever more be sighing for that “summer morn” of the Eternal Day in Heaven…

 

It’s been lonely here…

It’s been a while since I’ve posted (I think since February). Let me re-start with a wonderful hymn of thanks, first published 300 years ago. Our songs of gratitude are ever sweet in God’s ear.

When all Thy mercies, O my God, my rising soul surveys,
Transported with the view I’m lost in wonder, love and praise.

Unnumbered comforts to my soul Thy tender care bestowed
Before my infant heart conceived from whom those comforts flowed.
When worn with sickness, oft hast Thou with health renewed my face;
And, when in sins and sorrows bowed, revived my soul with grace.
Thru ev’ry period of my life Thy goodness I’ll pursue,
And after death, in heav’n above, the glorious theme renew.

Joseph Addison, 1672–1719

I Must Tell Jesus

Some Sundays I get the privilege to play a brief instrumental “meditation” after the message. For me, it’s a time of prayer and reflection that is expressed through music. It quiets my heart and helps me reflect on the truth just preached in the message. It is worship, plain and simple.

I don’t plan what I’m going to play. I do this for a couple of reasons.

First, I like the musical challenge of making something up on the spot. It helps me stay sharp as a musician/arranger/composer. I don’t ever mean to do it from a prideful standpoint. Some people serve and minister in ways that I could never dream of. This is something that I can do, so I just try to offer it to the Lord from a grateful heart.

The second reason I don’t plan what I’m going to play is that I like for the Holy Spirit to move in me, leading me to a song that might be appropriate for the morning. Sometimes, that song is an old hymn. Sometimes the song is a contemporary song. Sometimes, I just improvise something new, in the moment…playing a “new song”, as it were.

I listen to the sermon like everyone does. I am challenged and encouraged as I trust everyone is as God’s Word is preached and proclaimed. I then respond, in that moment, with worship of a song. My prayer for the body is that you will respond with worship according to the way God has gifted you. Serve, speak, encourage, exhort, teach and lead according to the way God has gifted you, as an act of worship to Him.

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This morning’s song (Oct. 31) was an old hymn, called “I Must Tell Jesus”. Several of you asked about it after the service. The words are printed below. I trust they will be an encouragement to you…

I Must Tell Jesus

by Elisha A. Hoffman

I must tell Jesus all of my trials;
I cannot bear these burdens alone;
In my distress He kindly will help me;
He ever loves and cares for His own.

Refrain

I must tell Jesus! I must tell Jesus!
I cannot bear my burdens alone;
I must tell Jesus! I must tell Jesus!
Jesus can help me, Jesus alone.

I must tell Jesus all of my troubles;
He is a kind, compassionate friend;
If I but ask Him, He will deliver,
Make of my troubles quickly an end.

Refrain

Tempted and tried, I need a great Savior;
One Who can help my burdens to bear;
I must tell Jesus, I must tell Jesus;
He all my cares and sorrows will share.

Refrain

O how the world to evil allures me!
O how my heart is tempted to sin!
I must tell Jesus, and He will help me
Over the world the victory to win.

Hebrews 2:18 “For because he himself has suffered when tempted, he is able to help those who are being tempted.” (ESV)

Hebrews 4:15-16 “For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need”

Joining with you in prayer,

Brad